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Escalating Wickedness of Man – Genesis 6:1-6:8

Taken together, these first two scenes express what happens to Man without God’s desire to strive with Man, without his grace.  Evil once left uncontained by grace, will eventually consume the Earth and result in the total destruction of all creation.  The escalation of evil between the scenes is not only at the global level but at the spiritual level.  It is only by the grace of God that Man is not consumed by his evil.

The Art will be visible once we have at least five pieces to show.

Genesis 6:1-8

New American Standard Bible (NASB)

Now it came about, when men began to multiply on the face of the land, and daughters were born to them, that the sons of God saw that the daughters of men were beautiful; and they took wives for themselves, whomever they chose. Then the Lord said, “My Spirit shall not strive with man forever, because he also is flesh; nevertheless his days shall be one hundred and twenty years.” The Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward, when the sons of God came in to the daughters of men, and they bore children to them. Those were the mighty men who were of old, men of renown.

Then the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. The Lord was sorry that He had made man on the earth, and He was grieved in His heart. The Lord said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, from man to animals to creeping things and to birds of the sky; for I am sorry that I have made them.” But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord.

The Theme Explained

Before continuing, read the passage above and slowly let the images soak in.  Each image is someone’s personal expression of the theme.  Discover how the images reveal the theme from the passage.


The first two scenes of this narrative present an escalation of Man’s wickedness as well as God’s response to that wickedness.

The giants and the mythical heroes of old both center around Man.  In fact, the author explains that the mythical heroes are a result of wickedness between giants and the daughters of Man.  Thus, the narrator is destroying any deification or hero-worship of these mythical characters.  God’s response to this evil is also telling in that God is not willing to strive with or force a balance with Man.  The statement implies that to that point, God was containing the level of Evil in the world.  However, from this point on, God was going to allow Evil to expand and yield its inevitable result.

While the first scene suggests evil is allowed to be unleashed, the second scene is the culmination of this spreading of evil.  The focus is now on Man and the evil that is at the heart of Man.  The emphasis on evil in the second scene alludes to the ubiquitous infiltration of evil at every level of Man, from social, to personal, to even spiritual.   God’s response is again telling of the situation.  In this response, God has allowed Man to descend to the point of destruction.  God’s regret over the situation is not a regret based on a past decision, but a regret over the coming justice.  This is the inevitable conclusion to the path that was allowed in the first scene.

Taken together, these first two scenes express what happens to Man without God’s desire to strive with Man, without his grace.  Evil once left uncontained by grace, will eventually consume the Earth and result in the total destruction of all creation.  The escalation of evil between the scenes is not only at the global level but at the spiritual level.  It is only by the grace of God that Man is not consumed by his evil.

 

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